Kamchatka, on road to the fieldwork site

Ring of Fire: the future of ecological climate change research?

‘Ring of Fire’ is a four-year research project that investigates how rising temperatures of global warming could affect freshwater ecosystems. A team of scientists are visiting five high-latitude sites where geothermal activity generates a temperature gradient across freshwater streams. The streams are used as ‘natural laboratories’ to investigate how global warming could impact everything from gene expression to whole ecosystem processes, in systems that are experiencing … Continue reading Ring of Fire: the future of ecological climate change research?

Our "commute to work". A 7.5km hike across mudflats, wetland, ice and rivers

Ring of Fire: how biofilms will help us understand the impacts of climate change

‘Ring of Fire’ is a NERC-funded research project that, over the course of four years and five geothermal sites in the Arctic Circle, investigates the impact of rising temperatures of global warming on freshwater ecosystems. Danielle Harris has just returned from an eight-day fieldwork trip in Svalbard, where she scrubbed nearly 300 rocks to see how temperature affects the community composition of biofilms, and the … Continue reading Ring of Fire: how biofilms will help us understand the impacts of climate change

It’s not just the plight of the bumblebee, we need to protect all our pollinators

Kate Rowell, Grantham Institute and Imperial College Business School Master’s student studying Climate Change, Management and Finance, looks at why bees are suffering the impacts of climate change and what this means for global biodiversity and food security. What’s the problem? Three quarters of global food production relies on pollination to some degree, and for 5-8% pollination is vital. Similarly, 87.5% of the world’s flowering plants … Continue reading It’s not just the plight of the bumblebee, we need to protect all our pollinators

Who runs the world? Women, if we want prosperity, sustainability and life

On International Women’s Day, MSc Climate Change, Management and Finance student Cecilia L’Ecluse considers why it is that the changes brought about by global warming will be a disproportionate burden on women – and why women’s leadership and involvement is key to the future of our planet. Following severe flooding in Bangaladesh in 1991, nine times more women than men died. In May 2008, cyclone Nargis … Continue reading Who runs the world? Women, if we want prosperity, sustainability and life

En route to Marrakech: From the Atlas mountains to the Atlantic Ocean

Science and Solutions for a Changing Planet DTP student Oliver Schmidt is attending the UN Climate Change conference (COP22) this week. He shares his impression of the host country Morocco and how it may be affected by climate change. Before the “action” COP officially kicked off in Marrakech on Monday, I travelled to the Kingdom of Morocco to get a personal perspective of this year’s … Continue reading En route to Marrakech: From the Atlas mountains to the Atlantic Ocean

Wavering water: why round-the-clock urban water supply matters

Grantham PhD student Simon De Stercke looks at how Mumbai residents cope with just a few hours of running water per day – and why this needs to change, as part of his research on the urban water-energy nexus. By 2050, two thirds of our planet’s population will live in cities. Creating a blueprint for sustainable cities is therefore the key to unlocking a sustainable … Continue reading Wavering water: why round-the-clock urban water supply matters

How eating less meat could help prevent extinction, climate change, cancer and the next pandemic

  Grantham Lecturer in Global Change Ecology, Dr Kris Murray, explains why, from farm to fork, less is more when it comes to meat. I’m not a vegetarian, and I’m unlikely to become one any time soon. I like making sausages and barbequing ribs, I love prosciutto crudo and lamb kebabs, and I’m a total sucker for a bit of bacon in my lettuce and … Continue reading How eating less meat could help prevent extinction, climate change, cancer and the next pandemic

What is China doing to protect and improve the environment?

Grantham Institute Head of Policy and Translation, Alyssa Gilbert, joined a group of Imperial College London students and staff on a trip to China. At Beijing’s Tsing Hua University, she saw a passion for protecting the natural environment at odds with the country’s pursuit of economic growth. Like all universities, Imperial encourages international discourse and collaboration between academics and students across the globe. I recently … Continue reading What is China doing to protect and improve the environment?